Is ILT Really Working?

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Is ILT Really Working?

jlincatering.com

jlincatering.com

jlincatering.com

jlincatering.com

In the beginning of the school year, Individualized Learning Time was introduced to Ashley Ridge. The purpose of the extended free period was to provide the opportunity for teachers and students to take care of their business during the middle of the day. Students could no longer create excuses for make-up work. Teachers would be available for extra help. Clubs could have a time and place to meet.

The Ashley Ridge student body has now been adjusted to the concept for over two months. Many have started to question the success of ILT. The crowds in the cafeteria are evidence of a flawed system. Outbursts take place regularly that result in authority mediating. Lunch lines can be extremely long, wrapping around hallways, and  waiting is an inefficient use of time. Treating ILT as an “open campus” to leave and go get lunch is not uncommon. Too many students are using the time period socially. They are expected to be utilizing classrooms, but students are entitled to a break during the day.

ILT is beneficial when students are absent. It eliminates the struggle of having to arrive early or leave later to make something up. However, focusing on a quiet task in a noisy room while other students enjoy a free period to socialize, can be challenging.

In other schools around the country, opting out of a lunch period is normal in order to take on another Advanced Placement course. Students would rather have a packed schedule with as many classes they can fit under their belt than eating and socializing.

Depending on the person, ILT could be considered a lifesaver and stress reliever, or a waste of a potentially productive hour. The answer to the question “Is ILT really working?” lies in the hands of the individual.

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