South Carolina Wildfire

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South Carolina Wildfire

Map of the Severity of the Wildfire

Map of the Severity of the Wildfire

Map of the Severity of the Wildfire

Map of the Severity of the Wildfire

Olivia Brown, Writer

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In the early morning of Tuesday, wildfires began to break out and stretch across the southeastern mountains. This ultimately caused smoke to travel many parts of South Carolina, NorthCarolina, Georgia, and Kentucky.

 ABC News4 stated that around 4 p.m., Charleston had an AQI of 169. According to SCDHEC, anything above 151 is considered “unhealthy.”

A total of 40 fires were started in the southeastern mountains. North Carolina was hit pretty hard compared to the other states. They had at least 15 active fires that destroyed more than 45,000 acres of forest.

Precautions were immediately taken and the Elementary and Middle schools in Dorchester District 2 were instructed to keep their students inside for recess.

The smoke was dense enough to affect a person with weak lungs or a weak respiratory system. People were instructed not to stay outside for long periods of time.

Thousands of firefighters worked to contain fires in North and South Carolina along with fires in Tennessee and Georgia.

A lot of money was used to help put out the fires. Researches say that an average of 1 to 2 million dollars was spent to tame the fires in the southeast.

The smoke fully left the South Carolina state yesterday and South Carolina is no longer in a warning-state of emergency for fire.

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