Transgender Americans Could be Losing More Rights

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Transgender Americans Could be Losing More Rights

Photo Credit: morelightpresbyterian.org

Photo Credit: morelightpresbyterian.org

Photo Credit: morelightpresbyterian.org

Photo Credit: morelightpresbyterian.org

Jessica Townsend, Editor

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The Trump Administration has been considering changing the definition of gender into the sex one is assigned at birth. This goes against the Obama administration’s ruling a few years ago, in which a citizens sex was genetic, and their gender depended on their personal identity. If this new definition is accepted, transgender people would literally be written out of legal existence. This means that they could lose all of their rights and protections previously protected under the federal civil rights law.

Under this new law, a person’s gender would be determined by whether they were assigned male or female at birth, and “any dispute over one’s sex would have to be clarified using genetic testing” (nytimes). Even if someone has had surgery to match their gender, they’d still be classified by their birth sex.

These guidelines would eradicate federal recognition of an estimated 1.4 million Americans. Harper Jean Tobin, the policy director of the National Center for Transgender Equality, called the change, “an extremely aggressive legal position that is inconsistent with dozens of federal court decisions.”

If this law passes, it will have many serious effects on the lives of transgender Americans. It could determine which locker rooms, bathrooms, and sports teams they can be in. It may also require DNA testing as part of their educational experience (vox).

This is not the first time the Trump administration has tried to revoke transgender rights. In July 2017, Trump announced a ban on transgender people in the military. This ban was revoked, and yet, in nearly two years following, only two of the one-hundred-forty applicants have been accepted. Many have been put on a waiting list for nearly six months, and have been asked to bring in all their medical records, lab results, hormone records, and doctors credentials (nytimes). The administration has also revoked protections of transgender students in federal funded schools, rescinded a memo protecting trans workers, and stripped protections for trans prisoners.

Furthermore, in twenty six states, it is completely legal to discriminate against LGBT+ citizens in the workplace. In two more states, it is legal to discriminate against transgender workers, but not gay, lesbians, or bisexuals workers (lgbtmap).

Any people with objections to this proposal can call the DHHS Public Comments Line(202) 205-5445, or the DHHS Correspondance Line(202) 690-6392. The Justice Department will make its decision on this topic by the end of 2018.

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