Piglets Born at Coastal Carolina Fair

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Piglets Born at Coastal Carolina Fair

Piglets at the Coastal Carolina Fair.

Piglets at the Coastal Carolina Fair.

Piglets at the Coastal Carolina Fair.

Piglets at the Coastal Carolina Fair.

Sierra Wilson, Writer/Editor

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Just recently, Ashley Ridge’s very own pig, Delta, gave birth to six piglets – three boys and three girls – at the Coastal Carolina Fair. According to Casey Attaway, a teacher for agriculture at AR for four years, this is Delta’s third time giving birth.

This time, it was a planned pregnancy so the piglets could be shown at the fair. Attaway says, “We knew we wanted to breed within a certain window to have her have babies within a certain window. We thought we were on the right track and then when we got her to the fair, it was kind of like, ‘Oh, is she going to have these babies?’ because she waited until the end.”

The sire Delta was bred with is another one of Ashley Ridge’s own pigs, so it’s the first paired breeding the school has had as its own. The piglets, who are in excellent health, won’t be named and are going to be sold to new homes when they are old enough.

Though Ashley Ridge has a wide variety of animals, ranging from chickens to donkeys, the pigs are either used as part of the breeding program or they are known as feeder pigs, pigs meant to be sold for meat. Students in the agriculture program help care for the animals, but that’s only one of the many things they do.

“In their first year, they start with our agriscience class and that’s where they learn the basics of [agriculture] and the basics of what our program does. As they continue on throughout their time here at Ashley Ridge, they’ll learn a variety of things such as how to manage and take care of livestock on our school farm, they’ll learn about plants, how to grow flowers for sale, and how to grow vegetables in the garden,” Attaway says.

The students get very invested in the animals’ lives and the livestock help to teach kids responsibility. In some cases, students get to take home baby goats that can’t be cared for by their mothers. It’s a fun, educational program that’s very special to the school.

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